Tag Archives: homemade

Foodie Gifts: Homemade Butterscotch Sauce

Who doesn’t love receiving homemade gifts during the month of December – especially things that can be eaten!  Here’s my adaptation on a recipe for Homemade Butterscotch Sauce.  It’s quite easy and will keep for up to three months in the refrigerator.

Homemade Butterscotch Sauce
1 1/2 cups dark brown sugar
1/2 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup water
1 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons Scotch whisky
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

In a heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup, water and salt and cook to dissolve the sugar. Add the cream and simmer, stirring, until thickened, 10 minutes. Add the whisky and vanilla and simmer over low heat for 2 minutes. Let cool, then transfer to jars.

Enjoy!

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Filed under baking, candy, dessert, Food, gifts, How To, Recipes

In Print: Clips from Food Sections

500924275. – The Chicago Tribune A Bit of Vampire History for your Halloween Bash “This vampire thing goes back, all the way to antiquity. Old blood indeed. The trail begins in ancient Persia, where someone discovered a vase depicting a man struggling with a blood-sucking creature. The Aztecs, too, got in on the sanguineness, convinced that offering a victim’s blood ensured fertilization of the Earth.”

4. – The Boston Globe Someone’s Gotta Do It “There are 50 of them, four of us, and the task seems a bit daunting. Over the next two hours, we will taste 25 white wines and 25 reds (identities unknown), compare impressions, and take notes. What we hope to find are a handful of wines that deserve to be called the best at $12 and under – the Grand Cru of Plonk.”

3. – The LA Times There’s a New Taste for Quince “Neglected for decades, the quince seems an improbable candidate for revival today, when consumers demand sweet, ready-to-eat fresh fruit. Why is it, then, that in recent years three books of quince recipes and lore have appeared, the fruit increasingly is featured at high-end restaurants, and half a dozen of these have even been named after it?”

2. – The NY Times Tater Tots for Two: It’s a Date “And thus is born false hope. Because dating in New York, as countless sitcoms, magazine articles and resolutely plucky blogs can attest, is no picnic. But let’s say that, through some quirk of dinner party seating or online profiling, you manage to meet someone. Where to take them?”

1. – The Washington Post Take Stock: There’s an easier way to do it “Bouillon, or stock, or broth, is the foundation of a range of dishes, not just French ones. It is the essence of a risotto. It is the heart of a soup and constitutes the body of a stew. Few chefs could imagine a world without it. A restaurant kitchen without a large pot of simmering stock feels barren and soulless. But one of the first things you learn once you have graduated from the University of Food Writing and enter the Real World is that people don’t make stock. Even many food writers and chefs don’t make their own stock from scratch, at least not on their own free time. Stock should be just a matter of knuckles and dimes. Yet it seldom is.”

photo from The LA Times

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How to: Peanut Butter with Dried Cranberries!

homemade_peanut_butterRecipe after the jump…

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Filed under Food, How To, Recipes, Snack

In Print: Clips from Food Sections

24guidebasil_6505. – The Chicago Tribune Cool off with Homemade Ice Cream “The only thing homemade ice cream requires is advance planning because freezing is required for the machine’s canister (overnight), chilling is required for the base (a couple of hours), and then the finished ice cream requires a stint in the freezer too (a few hours).”

4. – The Boston Globe Seeking the Best Fried Chicken “Think Southern-fried chicken, and chances are the next words that come to mind are “secret herbs and spices.’’ To me, that’s Southern-fried baloney. Prolonged immersion in very hot grease is not a method that coaxes out bouquet; the only elements likely to survive are garlic and cayenne. But spicing aside, the sine qua non of good fried chicken certainly is the crust, the best being a simply seasoned flour- or cornmeal-based coating delicately but thoroughly welded to the skin in a crisp, delicious synthesis.”

3. – The LA Times Train Chefs Keep Quality on Track “Shaun Murphy was facing a chef’s worst nightmare: a dining room full of guests and nothing to feed them. And running around the corner to the market was absolutely out of the question. Murphy was cooking aboard a train that was stuck between Los Angeles and Chicago. A highly regarded chef, Murphy was in the galley of a private rail car that was delayed for 12 hours after a train up ahead went off the track in Iowa. The passengers had been scheduled to arrive at their destination well before dinner, but Murphy wasn’t about to let them go hungry.”

2. – The NY Times Refreshing by Definition “BASIL Unless you sell your own line of pesto, there’s only so much basil you can use. So why not drink it? A distant cousin of MINT, basil can be put to some of the same uses in cocktails, but with predictably different results. MUDDLE it or just toss it in the shaker and let the ICE do the work (but use a strainer). Basil plays well with fruit, even pineapple.”

1. – The Washington Post Where There’s Smoke, There’s Flavor “Although smoking cigarettes has nearly become anathema in modern society, smoking foods is more in vogue than ever. Smoke, it seems, is like a fifth flavor (or sixth, if you allow for umami), with the ability to transform, contrast with and accentuate the food that has been exposed to it, whether that is salmon, pork, fruit, chili peppers or tea. In gastronomy, smoke is the door to another room, a lively, hazy space that is at once promising and almost limitless, yet also dark and dangerous.”

photo from The NY Times

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Pretty Suet Feeders

suetvineballI recently joined Craftster and am having a blast finding new crafting projects.  Yesterday I came across this Suet Feeder and couldn’t resist sharing it.  I haven’t attempted one myself yet, but as a child my sisters and I would use the remaining half of the grapefruit after we had breakfast and fill it with the bacon grease, peanut butter and sunflower seeds and the birds seemed to love it.

This is much prettier than the versions we made, and would be a great hostess gift.  For complete directions, keep reading…

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Filed under crafts, Home Keeping