Tag Archives: french

D.C. American Lamb Pro-Am!

Hi All 🙂  Thanks for coming on over to check out this recipe I put together for the very first D.C. American Lamb Pro-Am Challenge!   I have a little experience with this lean, mean grazing machine from a ways back, but love trying new techniques!  I was thrilled when I opened my refrigerated bag to find a hunk of a piece (boneless leg) of lamb from Border Springs Farm down in Southwest Virginia.  I knew I just had to try baking it in a salt crust – one of the oldest methods for cooking fish that always keeps the flesh perfectly moist and tender!  And if that seems odd that fish and lamb can be cooked the same way, give it a whirl, your taste buds will be pleasantly surprised!

Salt Baked Boneless Leg of Lamb

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • One 6-7 pound boneless leg of lamb
  • Fresh pepper for seasoning
  • One 48 oz. box of Kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup Herbs de Provence
  • 8 large egg whites
  • Thyme Sprigs for garnishing, if desired

Instructions:

  • Preheat the oven to 375° Fahrenheit
  • Remove the lamb from packaging and season with the freshly ground pepper
  • In a large frying pan that is safe to go in the oven, heat the olive oil until hot.  Add the lamb and let cook on each “side” on medium high heat until browned – about 7-10 minutes.
  • While the lamb is browning, make the salt crust mixture by placing the egg whites in a mixer and beating just until frothy.  Add the Kosher salt and Herbs de Provence and mix until combined.
  • When the lamb is finished browning, remove the pan from the heat and pack the salt mixture all around the lamb, leaving no open spaces (you don’t want the steam/moisture to to escape when baking).
  • Place the lamb in the oven and roast until the meat registers 120° Fahrenheit for medium-rare.  This should take 40-60 minutes, so check early to be sure to not over cook the meat!
  • Remove the roast from the oven and let sit for 10 minutes for the salt crust to set.  Then, crack off the crust to reveal the meat.  Discard the salt and droppings in the pan.
  • Place the lamb on a serving platter and let set for another 10 minutes before serving.  Enjoy!

White Bean & Garlic Smash with Sun-Dried Tomatoes (the perfect accompaniment for this lamb!)

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 cans of cannellini beans
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 15-20 garlic cloves, pealed
  • 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes

Instructions:

  • Start by roasting the garlic in the olive oil in a small dish (I put this in with the lamb).
  • Once the garlic is softened and gently toasted (about 20 minutes), remove from the oven and add the salt, beans and sun-dried tomatoes.
  • Place the dish back in the oven so the flavors can roast and meld together while the lamb is still cooking.
  • Remove from the oven once golden brown on top and serve along side the lamb.  Enjoy!

 

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Francophiles Unite!

BastilleDayCroissant

For Make-it Monday, instead of storming a Parisian prison, storm into that kitchen and get cooking!  Thursday’s the day the French stormed the Bastille prison in 1789, an open act of rebellion against the monarchy that is considered a turning point of the French Revolution.

After the Revolution, “while their former bosses were fleeing the country or losing their heads to the guillotine, chefs of the royal court found themselves out on the rue without so much as a roux to whisk,” said Carl Hanson.

Lucky for them, a promising new institution had begun popping up in Paris during the second half of the 18th century. This new-fangled thing was known as the restaurant. The first restaurants had opened in the 1760s and originally catered to those of fragile health. In fact, the word “restaurant” refers not to resting or ranting but to the “restorative” broths that were intended to return delicate Parisians and weary travelers to good health.

With the arrival of revolution, however, the restaurant became a venue for displaced chefs to practice their craft in a clean setting that, significantly, was open to all comers, not just royalty. For once, it did not require a noble pedigree to dine like a king, only sufficient funds to pay the check. And with that, the art of fine dining was born!

So, in celebration today, we made homemade croissants (the recipe is after the jump).   This one if not for the faint of heart, but the results are well worth the effort!  Bon appetit!

Classic French Croissants
adapted from Epicurious

1 1/2 cups whole milk, heated to warm (105°F–110°F)
1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
1 tbsp plus 1/4 tsp active dry yeast
3 3/4 to 4 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon kosher salt
3 sticks (1 1/2 cups) really cold unsalted butter

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Vive Bastille Day!

Instead of storming a Parisian prison, storm into that kitchen and get cooking! Today’s the day the French stormed the Bastille prison in 1789, an open act of rebellion against the monarchy that is considered a turning point of the French Revolution.

After the Revolution, “while their former bosses were fleeing the country or losing their heads to the guillotine, chefs of the royal court found themselves out on the rue without so much as a roux to whisk,” said Carl Hanson.

Lucky for them, a promising new institution had begun popping up in Paris during the second half of the 18th century. This new-fangled thing was known as the restaurant. The first restaurants had opened in the 1760s and originally catered to those of fragile health. In fact, the word “restaurant” refers not to resting or ranting but to the “restorative” broths that were intended to return delicate Parisians and weary travelers to good health.

With the arrival of revolution, however, the restaurant became a venue for displaced chefs to practice their craft in a clean setting that, significantly, was open to all comers, not just royalty. For once, it did not require a noble pedigree to dine like a king, only sufficient funds to pay the check. And with that, the art of fine dining was born!

So, in celebration today, we made homemade croissants (the recipe is after the jump). And for a whole meal, check out a couple of our other favorite French-inspired recipes.

Simple & Healthy Crustless Quiche
Strawberry Tart with Basil Whipped Cream
Honey-Roasted Almond Vinaigrette
Foie Gras Toasts

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Filed under breakfast, dessert, Food, holiday, Outside DC, Recipes, Uncategorized