In Print: Clips from Food Sections

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5. – The Chicago Tribune Recession Leads Cooks Outdoors to the Grill “The barbecue association estimates 85 million American households, 8 out of 10, own a grill or smoker. And more than half of all grill owners are now grilling at least a couple of times a week, according to the Weber survey.”

4. – The Boston Globe Gardening’s Popularity is Growing “Flavia Graf Reardon is growing things. Lots of things. In the garden she shares with her husband, Tim, there are onions, leeks, carrots, peas, rhubarb, kale, collards, spinach, broccoli rabe, salad greens, raspberries, two kinds of cherries, currants, gooseberries, and many varieties of herbs. Far from rural, this homestead is a few blocks from Egleston Square on the Jamaica Plain/Roxbury line, where you’re as likely to hear bass thumping from the cars on nearby Washington Street as crickets.”

3. – The LA Times Rose Wines Bloom in Many Shades “More than any other wine category, rosé is a mood. There is simply nothing better on a warm afternoon, a salve for sun-drenched, heat-driven thirst. It is more often gulped than sipped, never contemplated, rarely complicated. But there is much to say about a bottle of rosé beyond “it’s empty.” It’s made, after all, in a broad array of styles from nearly every red grape known to man, in nearly every wine region on Earth. So before your next gulp, read on; a wine with so many shades deserves a closer inspection.”

2. – The NY Times Preserving Time in a Bottle (or a Jar) “Preserving food cannot be considered new and trendy, no matter how vigorously it’s rubbed with organic rosemary sprigs. But the recent revival of attention to it fits neatly into the modern renaissance of handcrafted food, heirloom agriculture, and using food in its season. Like baking bread or making a slow-cooked tomato sauce, preserving offers primal satisfactions and practical results. And in today’s swirl of food issues (local, seasonal, organic, industrial), home preserving can also be viewed as a quasi-political act.”

1. – The Washington Post They Had to Hand it to Me “Soft-shell crabs are the jewel of the Chesapeake, a culinary luxury on par with truffles, caviar and champagne. Or so they say.  Delicate and expensive, sure. But I have to confess, I’ve never understood the fuss. Soft-shells don’t really taste like much besides deep-fried batter, the prevailing flavor in most preparations. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. But there are cheaper and easier ways to satisfy that craving… I tasted all of Gray’s preparations, plus some oversize whales that J&W’s Wade deep-fried right out of the tank in Deltaville. None had an intense crabby flavor, but done right, they had a texture that was something special. The fried crabs were meaty, salty and juicy, a combination impossible to criticize. In Gray’s dishes, the crabs added little juice explosions to the delicate sauces and flavor combinations.”

photo from The LA Times

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Filed under Beverage, entertaining, Food, Gardening, How To, News, Outside DC

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