From the Kitchen of: Patrick Deiss

pat-behind-bread2941 Restaurant is excited to introduce their entirely new line-up of its much celebrated bread. Artisan baker Patrick Deiss prepares the new bread twice daily to complement Chef Chemel’s innovative menu. The new recipes change weekly using high quality market ingredients and seasonal products to create a bread experience that is fresh, modern and more in harmony with the latest dishes coming out of Chemel’s kitchen. Current styles and flavors include olive rosemary, San Francisco sourdough, French artisan baguette, sour cherry chocolate, cranberry pecan and Pumpernickel.

Deiss’s breads are available both to diners in the restaurant and for sale to the general public. The bread will have to be picked up at the restaurant, but orders can be placed by calling 703-270-1690.

What is your favorite kitchen gadget?
My Japanese chef knife for all of my fine slicing. More recently my bread mixer for giving me great doughs.

What is the most overrated food/technique in restaurants today?
While I enjoy sous vide cooking and all that it has brought the industry, I believe that it will pass. I’m a purist when it comes to food and keeping things as simple as can be and being drawn in by the best ingredients and proper technique.

If you were to open a restaurant with a different type of cuisine than what you are cooking now, what would it be?
A little neighborhood French Asian restaurant with simplicity and Asian décor. Also, an old style bakery with a great coal fired oven.

What is your favorite local product or purveyor to work with?
Organic heirloom tomatoes from Tuscarora in Pennsylvania and Whipple Farms where Doug Whipple grows beautiful bio-dynamic vegetables and herbs.

What is your biggest customer pet peeve?
When customers request salt and pepper before tasting their food first.

What do you drink/eat after work?
Enjoy a Fiji water, fresh salad good olive oil, lemon and balsamic and bread, of course.

What is your favorite thing to cook at home? Will you share the recipe with us?
Thai Beef and Basil for my daughters Brianna and Maya, their favorite. Recipe after the jump.

Thai Beef and Basil
1 pound flank steak (sliced thinly against the grain)
1 tbsp galangal or ginger, (peeled and minced)
1 stalk lemon grass (bottom third, smashed and minced finely)
1 lime leaf (stem removed)
2 shallots (minced)
2 thai red chiles (minced)
1 large onion (thinly sliced)
2 scallions (minced, with greens)
1 red bell pepper (thinly sliced)
½ bunch thai basil (roughly chopped)
¼ cup cilantro (roughly chopped)
salt and black pepper (freshly ground), to taste

Marinade and Sauce:
1 cup chicken stock or vegetable broth
½ cup sweet soy
¼ cup fish sauce
3 tbsp palm sugar, or brown sugar
1 lime (zested and juiced)
1 tbsp cornstarch

Method:
1. Clean the flank steak of any fat or silver skin and freeze briefly for 15 minutes to allow for easy slicing.
2. Mix all ingredients for the sauce and whisk in the cornstarch until smooth.
3. While the flank is freezing, cut shallots, ginger, lemongrass, onion, scallions, chiles and bell pepper and chop the thai basil, and add the lime leaf.
4. Slice the flank steak across the grain on a bias to get paper thin slices about 2 inches in length.
5. Take ¼ cup of the sauce mixture and marinade the beef for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
6. Place a wok or large skillet over high heat, add ¼ cup vegetable oil and when just smoking, add the beef in several batches until just cooked and golden brown. Remove the beef to a strainer and discard the oil.
7. Wipe out the wok, add 2 tbsp oil and sauté the ginger, shallots, lemongrass and chiles with lime leaf for 2 minutes, add the onion and sauté until just colored.
8. Add the bell pepper, add the beef back in, season with a touch of salt and black pepper, pour in the sauce and let reduce for 2 minutes on high heat until syrup consistency, add the scallions, thai basil and cilantro and serve with steamed jasmine rice.

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Filed under baking, bread, Food, Interview, Restaurants

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