In Print: Clips from Food Sections

5. – The Boston Globe Corner the Market “It’s late July and the farmers’ markets are flush. For a month or more, growers have been picking a ripe cherry tomato here and a green bean there, but only for their own tables. Now there’s finally enough to pack the bushel baskets and drive them to market. From now on, the produce just gets better and better – until the frost.”

4. – The Chicago Tribune Hold the Mayo – And don’t let go! “In a nation that is waging war against childhood obesity, and where good and bad cholesterol numbers are bantered about at cocktail parties with the same excitement as celebrity gossip, one condiment defies today’s health-conscious trend. Mayonnaise: It’s the glue of salads and celebrations. Whether you prefer full-throttle mayo, fat-free, lower-fat, soy-based, organic, trans-fat-free or subtly flavored, supermarket shelves are stacked with mayonnaise choices, and consumers are snapping them up.”

3. – The LA Times Los Angeles Chefs are Happy to be in a Pickle “Pickles might be scarcer in contemporary home kitchens than they were a century ago, but scan a brasserie menu, or order a bar special at a gastropub or a charcuterie plate at an urban steakhouse, and everywhere: pickles.”

2. – The NY TImes Slow Food Savors Its Big Moment “Slow Food’s leaders, the chef Alice Waters chief among them, bristle at the criticism. But most acknowledge that the organization did not translate well to an American audience. As a result, it has never had as much cultural or political impact as its parent group in Europe…. Its philosophy — that food is about much more than cooking and eating — is often hammered home by Mr. Petrini on his frequent trips around the world.”

1. – The San Francisco Chronicle Global Food Crisis Comes Back to Calories “Calories are at the root of today’s most important nutritional problems. Those of us in the Western world get far too many. Much of the rest of the world doesn’t get nearly enough. And for everyone, calories are suddenly getting very expensive. Calories measure the energy value of food. They are a quick way of talking about the amount of food we eat and how much that food costs. Eat too many calories for the number you use, and on come the pounds. Food tempts us everywhere, even in places like business supply stores, bookstores and libraries. It comes in larger and larger portions. And we are expected to snack all day long.”

Photo from The Boston Globe


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